Visual Rhetoric- Flowers3399

End Family Fire

0:00-0:01- The ad starts with a cartoon on tv of a train and its conductor traveling out of a tunnel on the tracks.

0:02- The camera pans out to show the rec room and dining room. The tv is still playing the cartoon. In the rec room, there are toys that lay on the floor underneath the table as well as on top of the table. Pillows are on the ground and a blanket is draped over a chair. There is a child laying on a carpet on his stomach in the middle of the floor in pajamas. An older man in a blue shirt is in the scene. The man is presumingly the child’s father and is holding onto the child’s sides

0:03-0:05- The father begins to tickle his son. The son flips over to his back in a fit of laughter. The father begins to laugh with his son.

0:05-0:07- The father stops tickling his son and begins to walk away.

0:07-0:09- The father is out of the scene and the son remains to lie on the floor. The camera is zoomed in on the son with the background blurred. He is laying on his back and looking up at possibly the ceiling. His hands are resting on his chest.

0:09-0:10- The scene is still zoomed in on the son. He remains to lie on his back with his hands resting on his chest. He turns his head to the side to look towards a door.

0:10-0:12- The scene has now moved to the kitchen. The background of the kitchen is blurred out. The father is walking into the kitchen and his back is facing the camera. The main focus is the countertop. On the countertop, there is a glass of water and two bowls stacked together.

0:12-0:13- The background of the kitchen is in focus. A doorway in the kitchen leading to another room can now be seen. There is a coffee pot, the sink, and dish soap. The father walks over to the sink and he is rolling up the sleeves of his shirt.

0:13-0:15- The father is still walking to the sink. He continues to roll up his sleeves. One of his hands is reaching for something. The father starts to turn around to look at something or someone and begins to say something.

0:15-0:17- The scene pans back to the son. The son is now standing in the middle of the floor with a door behind him. He begins to talk to his father.

0:17-0:21- The sentence “8 kids a day are accidentally killed or injured by FAMILY FIRE” pans across the screen with a black background.

0:21-0:25- The sentence “FAMILY FIRE is a shooting involving an improperly stored gun” pans across the screen with a black background.

0:25-0:30- The screen has a black background providing a website about making homes safer.      

One thought on “Visual Rhetoric- Flowers3399”

  1. You’ve told us a good bit about what you’re looking at, Flowers, but very little about what it makes you think or feel. The name of the assignment “Visual Rhetoric” is an instruction to describe how well or how poorly the visual component of this highly visual medium MAKES AN ARGUMENT.

    Reading your analysis so far, we get no sense that an argument of any kind is being made, and perhaps that’s the fault of the director. But you could tell us THAT to satisfy your own obligation.

    I invite you to read Kevin Bacon’s analysis of this same video. You’ll find much more detail there, and a good bit of analysis of why the director made choices. Is this a working dad and his son on a Monday after a weekend together? How’s their relationship? Where’s mom? What’s the significance of the Family Fire warning to this particular set of guys?

    Yes, you’ll have to speculate, just as your brain does every time you watch TV with the sound muted. What’s THAT all about, it wonders, making judgments from what you see, drawing conclusions, making mistakes.

    Read my advice to KB too. You’ll both find it useful, and I hate to have to write it twice.

    https://counterintuitivefa18.com/2018/10/04/visual-rhetoric-kevinbacon/

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s