Visual Argument Rewrite- P1nk123456

  • Visual Analysis of One Second of Video

     

    0:00-0:01

    These scene takes place outside of a nice house in a seemingly nice suburban neighborhood. It is a new, middle class neighborhood with houses that are close together; they are nicely detailed. The house is on an incline. The weather is nice and sunny as if it was the morning.

     

    There is a little girl riding in a black toy car on the grass in front of the house. The toy car is most likely a Jeep. The front door is opened and she is on the front lawn so we know that someone is watching the girl since she is in a vehicle close to the road. There is also a nice red SUV parked in the driveway without a license plate. The person who drove the car last backed the car into the driveway all the way to the garage. It makes it easier to drive out of the driveway. It also keeps the car off of the decline.

    0:02-0:04

    The video zooms into a young, teenage girl of the age of 17 or 18. She is texting on her phone while she is walking outside of her front door. She turns right towards her driveway.

    The camera points towards the little girl, assumed to be the younger sister. The older sister reaches her hand down, looks as if she wants to give her sister a high five.

    0:04-0:07

    The teenager had her handout for a high five so we can believe that she is a nice older sister and a possible role model. She gives her sister a fie and after the high five, the little girl drives out of the shot in her toy car. The older sister continues walking towards the driveway.

    0:08-0:10

    As the teenager walks to the car, a woman who can be assumed to be her mom also walks outside. She is saying something to her daughter before she enters the car. Possibly a warning or telling her something to remember. The woman looks happy.

    0:11-0:14

    We watch the teenager enter and sit in the car. The camera goes back to the mother who states something to her daughter while putting her hand onto her chest. Possibly still reminding her to do something.

    0:14-0:15

    The camera goes back to the daughter who is responding to her mom while closing the driver’s door.

    0:16-0:17

    We watch as the driver puts her cellphone into the glove compartment in the car. I am guessing that her mom reminded her to put her cellphone away and out of reach.

    0:18-0:19

    She then proceeds to fix her rear view mirror. We can believe that she has been practicing driving and knowns how to be safe and responsible.

    0:20-0:23

    Her mother then says one last thing, possibly a goodbye then the teenagers slowly drives out of the driveway.

    0:23-0:25

    The mother watches her daughter drive away and places her hands on her hips. The younger daughter drives back onto the grass with her toy car.

    0:26-0:29

    The camera the angles directly onto the younger daughter. She states something that is probably exhausive or sarcastic in a kid way. And her mother remarks something back in a lighthearted manner.

    0:30-0:37

    The camera points towards the little girl while she smiles and laughs towards her mother. She smiles down at her fake iPhone while still sitting the toy car.

    The camera goes to a side angle of the girl. She is raising her phone to her eye level. She is still in the car. She proceeds to throw the phone behind her out of the side of the car. We can watch as it hits the grass and she drives off in the toy car.

    The message is conveyed that we should not use our phone and drive at the same time.


     

    I just realized that this video is longer than 30 seconds. But the point was that texting and driving is no good when you can just pay attention to the road.

Enough About You- P1nk123456

Money seems to have a big role in our society; those in society can’t do much or get far without money. Money is valuable in different ways, even when it isn’t physical cash. In today’s society, faith is needed in the government and in the banking system that money is being handled in the proper manner; if not, then people would hide their money in secret places around the home. I have no clue what happens in the banks, or how they take care of their clients’ money. I always thought money was simple; someone either has it or doesn’t—that’s it. However, being introduced to this assignment, the Yap Fei, US gold, French francs, Brazilian cruzeros, and debit accounts now seem similar. Money isn’t visible transferred. When a company pays their employees, the transaction uses the direct transfer of money into an employee’s bank account. Employees just have to trust that money is in their account and valuable.

Rebuttal Argument- p1nk123456

 

**If this is all true, how do I expand it? I feel as though this isn’t factual information, mostly common knowledge and assumptions. This also isn’t necessarily specific to my topic. I search for counter arguments last night and I watched your video. I still feel like I cannot find an exact cause.

 

It can be argued that Black American’s suffer from self hatred at the hands of the majority White society. History makes it easy to blame White people for African-American’s desire to chemically change their hair and skin. This blame can actually be placed on Black Americans themselves.

In today’s society, a Black person’s need to conform is not the fault of White people. It is the fault of whoever feels the need to chemically straighten their hair. The oppression of slavery and segregation caused White people to feel shame in the presence of all Black people, who reminded them of the crime of previous centuries. Black people straightened their hair to ease White consciences by appearing to assimilate and following their beauty standards. When Black people maintain chemically straightened hair, it makes them and the White people around them comfortable since straight hair appears as a way to conform.

Whether you are Black, White, Asian or Latin, no one of any race or ethnicity chooses to look different and to not conform. The average person desire to fit into their culture’s mainstream beauty standards and fashion trend- this isn’t new. People within this society will do anything to conform to the standards set by our culture and to minimize their resentment of their differences. Self-consciousness will cause one to seek an opportunity to alter their difference in the direction of the set societal beauty standard. This is not evidence of self hatred; it is natural to want to conform to society and to look similar to everyone else. Black people are discontent with how they look in comparison to mainstream White beauty standards.

 

Robust Verbs- p1nk123456

  1. There is a huge problem in Vancouver with heroin addicts rob homes, mugging residents, and breaking into cars to support their habits.

Problem: The sentence starts with there is.

Fix: Revise the sentence

The problem with heroin addicts in Vancouver is that they commit crimes at a high rate since they will do anything to support their habits.

2. The “free heroin for addicts” program is doing everything they can to stop the addicts. The problem is that there is a large crime rate due to the addicts.

Problem: This sentence should come later since the first sentence was not expanded upon and it doesn’t flow with the next sentence.

Fix: Take it out and move it towards the end of the paragraph.

3. It is obvious that addicts have a hard time getting through their day to day lives. Daily activities such as jobs, interactions, and relationships are hard to maintain because of the fact that they are using. By heroin users being addicted, they will do whatever they have to do to get their hands on the drug. The types of crimes committed are those of breaking and entering as well as stealing. There are no limits to where they will go to retrieve this drug so that they can feed their addiction.

Problem: These sentences need to be streamlined and revised. They are repetitive.

Fix: Name the problems that heroin addicts have.

Maintaining a job, normal social interactions, and relationships are hard to preserve because they are using drugs.

4. The problem with this program is that it won’t help to ween these addicts off using heroin. It is only trying to save the city from rising crime rates that they’re up to. By providing the drug, these addicts will be off the streets, which in turn will prevent them from committing minor street crimes. This will also keep the heroin users out of the hospital. It is pointless that the hospitals have to deal with people that want to use bad drugs or unsanitary needles and find themselves being unable to afford hospital bills and hard to cope without the drug. This program gives people free heroin in the cleanest way possible.

Problem:  Needs to be streamlined. The idea of the program was brought up too early, so these sentences should be where the program is introduced. There are quite a few points made here about the program.

Fix: Change this to where the program needs to be mentioned.

The “free heroin for addicts” program tries to reduce the rate of crimes by offering heroin users the cleanest drugs possible. Providing drugs will keep heroin addicts off the streets, which will prevent them from committing minor street crimes, and keeps them away from hospitals where they acquire bills that they cannot afford.

5. This will in turn fix the city  but not the addiction that these people face.

Problem: This last sentence is actually okay, it just needs a comma and clarification.

Fix: Add a comma after but, clarify what “this” is, and state who “these people” are.

The “free heroin for addicts” program will hopefully reduce the rate of crimes in Vancouver, but not the addiction of heroin addicts.

 

There is a huge problem in Vancouver with heroin addicts rob homes, mugging residents, and breaking into cars to support their habits. Maintaining a job, normal social interactions, and relationships are hard to preserve because they are using drugs. The “free heroin for addicts” program tries to reduce the rate of crimes by offering heroin users the cleanest drugs possible. Providing drugs will keep heroin addicts off the streets, which will prevent them from committing minor street crimes, and keeps them away from hospitals where they acquire bills that they cannot afford.

Causal- P1nk123456

In America, generations of Black people have internally suffered self hatred. This hatred has been displayed through the way that the majority of Black people style their hair. The oppression caused by early White society and the social construct of American caused Black people to style their hair using harsh chemicals and processes to have hair that is similar to White people. Black people without “tamed” hair are have a harder time finding employment, are discontent with how they look in comparison to mainstream beauty standards, and were considered inferior to other Black people.

Generations of Black people, specifically women, in America have dealt with the social struggle of meeting the ideal beauty standard lead by White people in this country. This includes the style of their hair. They battle between not being White, but trying to look as though they fit in socially with the Eurocentric beauty standards of this country has impacted the hairstyle of Black people.

To understand the social struggles of Black Americas, one must look at the history of hair during the times of slavery. To look similar to the White people, African Americans developed a hierarchy imposed on themselves where those with lighter skin and straighter hair over those that reflected more African features were regarded as more attractive and appealing (Donaldson, 2018). This idea was internalized by African Americans and thus considered the beginning of the idea of “good hair” and colorism among Black people as slave owners would compare Black hair  “wool” and considered it inappropriate (Bryrd and Tharps, 2001, p. 26). To softer kinky hair texture, butter, bacon grease, and even kerosene were used in their hair (Vissa Studios, 2012). As damaging as this could be to the skin and hair, they were willing to do it to meet the expectations of the time.

Post emancipation, the idea of “good hair” grew stronger as African Americans wanted to be of a higher social status, as Eurocentric features were still considered ideal. It was hard enough to  prosper in a society while being considered second class, it was even harder without trying to have straighter hair and “to gain access to the American Dream one of the first things Black had to do was make White people more comfortable with their very presence (Bryd and Tharps, 2001, p.26). Black Americans continued to follow the double duty of investing in two things to “fix” their differences between them and the White side of society: Skin bleaching and hair straightening. These were the two remedies to fix their differences. This was when Black women, and some men, used hot combs and a harsh, alkaline chemical with lye known as relaxer to tame their hair. Relaxers are known to be damaging for the hair and scalp and causes breathing problems, but people still used them. At the time, Black women were seeking long straight hair that is flat, sleek, and shiny, which they consider “good hair”. As time went on, skin bleaching dramatically reduced as a practice, but still occurs, since it is has been seen as a ritual of self-hatred for their skin. Even though self-hatred is recognized, permanently altering hair texture continued to be a flourishing practice in Black communities and determine social status. Black people had to put effort into minimizing the difference between themselves and White people.

Another issue arises when searching for a job. For years, even today, there are official and unofficial policies within a work place that make the usual hairstyles of a Black person unacceptable in a work environment. Afros, curls, and dreads are considered unprofessional, even when they are neatly groomed. Even if they did not want their hair to be straight, it became a choice between having what they want and having a job. Straight hair became a financial advantage and a necessity.

Even if they are not told that straight hair is more attractive on women, it is seem in the media as that. From hair commercials to models in magazines and catalogs, for years we as Americans are exposed to predominantly White representation. Women, no matter what race, are susceptible to wanting to look like the model on the magazine cover or on the television advertisement. This is stronger within the mind of young Black girls because they have lacked the visual representation within the media for decades. The possibility of a younger Black girl looking like the beautiful women that are broadcasted is very slim. This leads to the feeling that their skin and hair are not worth being shown, to slowly morph into self-hate. The closest thing that they can change about themselves is their hair, which is chemically changed for unattainable aesthetics. Leading, again to the idea that the self-hate within the Black community is caused by the social construct of America’s predominantly White society.

Open Strong- P1nk123456

Nappy, kinky, or curly; they are all descriptions of Black hair. Natural Black or African hair can range from a soft, ‘S’ shaped curl pattern to tightly curled hair and even to the tight, ‘Z’ shape cross-section of a kinky afro. Originating in Africa, kinky hair evolved for the dry heat by pushing away heat and moisture from the scalp. The relatively sparse density of Afro textured hair in combination with its spring-like coils results in a light, airy, almost sponge-like form. Jablonski states in her writing that it likely facilitates an increase in the circulation of cool air onto the scalp. This hair type should be appreciated as a biological advantage and not considered “bad hair”. A strong majority of Black people believe their natural hair is considered unprofessional or unattractive. The negative connotations of natural Black hair seem to be ingrained in our minds from a young age. With this, I believe that Black people do not wear their hair naturally because they have been taught for centuries to assimilate into White society.

Generations of Black people, specifically women, in America have dealt with the social struggle of meeting the ideal beauty standard in this country when it comes to their hair. The battle between not being White, but trying to look as though they fit in socially with the Eurocentric beauty standards of this country has impacted the hairstyle of Black people for decades. To understand the social struggles of Black Americas, one must look at the history of hair during the times of slavery. To look similar to the White people, African Americans developed a hierarchy imposed on themselves where those with lighter skin and straighter hair over those that reflected more African features were regarded as more attractive and appealing (Donaldson, 2018). This idea was internalized by African Americans and thus considered the beginning of the idea of “good hair” and colorism among Black people as slave owners would compare Black hair  “wool” and considered it inappropriate (Bryrd and Tharps, 2001, p. 26). To softer kinky hair texture, butter, bacon grease, and even kerosene were used in their hair (Vissa Studios, 2012). As damaging as this could be to the skin and hair, they were willing to do it to meet the expectations of the time.

Definition Essay- P1nk123456

Definition- Good Hair

Nappy, kinky, or curly; they are all descriptions of Black hair. Natural Black or African hair can range from a soft, ‘S’ shaped curl pattern to tightly curled hair and even to the tight, ‘Z’ shape cross-section of a kinky afro. Originating in Africa, kinky hair evolved for the dry heat by pushing away heat and moisture from the scalp. The relatively sparse density of Afro textured hair in combination with its spring-like coils results in a light, airy, almost sponge-like form. Jablonski states in her writing that it likely facilitates an increase in the circulation of cool air onto the scalp. This hair type should be appreciated as a biological advantage and not considered “bad hair”. A strong majority of Black people believe their natural hair is considered unprofessional or unattractive. The negative connotations of natural Black hair seem to be ingrained in our minds from a young age. With this, I believe that Black people do not wear their hair naturally because they have been taught for centuries to assimilate into White society.

Generations of Black people, specifically women, in America have dealt with the social struggle of meeting the ideal beauty standard in this country when it comes to their hair. The battle between not being White, but trying to look as though they fit in socially with the Eurocentric beauty standards of this country has impacted the hairstyle of Black people for decades. To understand the social struggles of Black Americas, one must look at the history of hair during the times of slavery. To look similar to the White people, African Americans developed a hierarchy imposed on themselves where those with lighter skin and straighter hair over those that reflected more African features were regarded as more attractive and appealing (Donaldson, 2018). This idea was internalized by African Americans and thus considered the beginning of the idea of “good hair” and colorism among Black people as slave owners would compare Black hair  “wool” and considered it inappropriate (Bryrd and Tharps, 2001, p. 26). To softer kinky hair texture, butter, bacon grease, and even kerosene were used in their hair (Vissa Studios, 2012). As damaging as this could be to the skin and hair, they were willing to do it to meet the expectations of the time.

Post emancipation, the idea of “good hair” grew stronger as African Americans wanted to be of a higher social status, as Eurocentric features were still considered ideal. It was hard enough to  prosper in a society while being considered second class, it was even harder without trying to have straighter hair and “to gain access to the American Dream one of the first things Black had to do was make White people more comfortable with their very presence (Bryd and Tharps, 2001, p.26). Black Americans continued to follow the double duty of investing in two things to “fix” their differences between them and the White side of society: Skin bleaching and hair straightening. These were the two remedies to fix their differences. This was when Black women, and some men, used hot combs and a harsh, alkaline chemical with lye known as relaxer to tame their hair. Relaxers are known to be damaging for the hair and scalp and causes breathing problems, but people still used them. At the time, Black women were seeking long straight hair that is flat, sleek, and shiny, which they consider “good hair”. As time went on, skin bleaching dramatically reduced as a practice, but still occurs, since it is has been seen as a ritual of self-hatred for their skin. Even though self-hatred is recognized, permanently altering hair texture continued to be a flourishing practice in Black communities and determine social status. Black people had to put effort into minimizing the difference between themselves and White people.

Even with that, permanently altering hair texture continued to be a flourishing practice in Black communities and determine social status.

During the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s and 1970s, there was a new sense of identity among the Black communities. They started to appreciate the beauty of being Black and embodied the “Black is Beautiful” trend and as a reflection of Black pride (Davies, 2008). At the same time of this movement, it was more common for hair to be worn in its natural state as an untreated afro. Black Americans were rejecting the idea that they had to permanently alter themselves to assimilate and integrate into White America (Davies, 2008). Simultaneously, men and women were both realizing the afro style was easier to maintain without being costly or physically harmful.

On the other side, there were Black people that did not want to engage in the movement nor wanted to wear their hair in its natural state and “[c]onsequently, some African Americans begin to perceive some of their group members as not being “black enough” or not wanting to be identified as African American, which can lead to negative impacts on one’s self-esteem, and if persistent, may cause one to engage in self-hate” (Maurice, 2016). This caused another element of self-hate as these outsiders of the time were considered to not be Black enough or going against their people.

Towards the end of the 1970s, the afro because less of an empowering statement as the afro hairstyle started to become popular with people that were not Black. Instead, Black people started to style their hair with braids, cornrows, and straight weaves; all of which are still prevalent styles.

I know that it is a strong assumption to say that a lot of people that are White do not understand the concept of Black hair, but I have experienced the misconceptions and awkward interactions surrounded my hair. I believe that it is more ignorance and a lack of seeing natural hair than racism

 

References

Byrd, A., & Tharps, L. (2001). Hair story: Untangling the roots of Black hair in America. New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Davies, Carole Boyce. Encyclopedia of the African Diaspora: Origins, Experiences, and Culture. Vol. 1, ABC-CLIO, 2008.

Donaldson, Chanel. “Hair Alteration Practices Amongst Black Women and the Assumption of Self-Hatred.” NYU Steinhardt, Department of Applied Psychology, 2018, steinhardt.nyu.edu/appsych/opus/issues/2012/fall/hairalteration

Halder, Richard. “Structure and Function of Ethnic Skin and Hair.” Academia.edu, Dermatologic Clinic, 2003, http://www.academia.edu/6741767/Structure_and_function_of_ethnic_skin_and_hair.

JABLONSKI, NINA G. Skin: A Natural History. 1st ed., University of California Press, 2006. JSTOR, http://www.jstor.org/stable/10.1525/j.ctt1pn8zt.

Maurice, Sheldon. “Factors That Contribute to Self-Hatred in African-Americans: A Focus on Identity.” Vol. 13, no. 1, Apr. 2016, pp. 17–27., doi:10.1037/e643792012-001.

https://www.derm.theclinics.com/article/S0733-8635(13)00125-3/pdf

THE POLITICS OF BLACK HAIR A Focus on Natural vs Relaxed Hair for African-Caribbean Women by Michael Barnett

../The Politics of Black Hair- A Focus on Natural vs. Relaxed Hair for Afrian- Caribbean Women.pdf

WHY AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN TRY TO OBTAIN ‘GOOD HAIR’ Whitney Bellinger University of Pittsburgh at Bradford

WHY AFRICAN AMERICAN WOMEN TRY TO OBTAIN ‘GOOD HAIR’ Whitney Bellinger University of Pittsburgh at Bradford

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Afro-textured_hair

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZeXUm8OOUA8

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D0DgVijM7Z8

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xxQGXmEVw-4&t=470s