18 THU NOV 01

Cards on the table.

Cynicism is the thin veil that
protects a sentimentalist from caring too much.

I say what I believe as if it were true. My cards are face up on the table. If you ask me why I believe it, my reasonable response is that so far I’m winning the argument. Show your cards.

Sarcasm is vulnerability expressed as humor.


Wake Up

The Braille Riddle

Counterintuitive Thinking

37 thoughts on “18 THU NOV 01”

  1. 1. If you say your point as if you believe it. You are already winning the argument because the other person has not said anything yet to dispute or agree with you.
    2. We learned about Braille and how it was made and did a riddle with Braille.
    3. We then discussed advertising failures and how to reduce them based off failing.

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    1. Hey, D2F. You didn’t number your points. I did. Since we’re talking in card-play metaphors today, let me say this:

      1. You make claims in your first point. Instead of saying “what we talked about,” you distill the little lesson down to a few memorable claims. You’re winning this argument so far because you’ve shown your hand.
      2. You hold your cards and bluff.
      3. You hold your cards and bluff.

      “Talked about” language has no value in essays or in Notes.
      These Agenda Notes grades are not terribly substantial, but the exercise of reducing an hour’s lecture/discussion down to memorable claims is VERY VALUABLE.

      1/3

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    1. Thank you, Marvel. I can never tell. (I do know the exercise went better in your class than in the one that followed, so I guess I know something.) But too often I don’t know if what I’m saying resonates at all with my students. This little comment makes the hour worthwhile, and I appreciate it. I surely don’t want to be wasting my time, and the last thing I want to do is waste yours.

      Your Notes are woeful ( 🙂 ), but I do appreciate that you felt your brain moving. Thank you for that. Next time, take better Notes.

      1/3

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  2. Nov. 1 Notes
    -Anything can be made up, but if that statement is the best cards on the table, they are winning, until better cards are put on the table.
    -Braille uses a domino-like system where different dots raised mean different letters.
    -The mammogram correct result rate was only around 78%, when Dr. Adcock wanted to find a better way.

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    1. I like the specificity of these Notes, CW, and maybe I’m hoping for too much, but is there nothing you want to remember about Braille besides the technical format? Nothing you want to remember about Adcock’s controversial solution besides the initial success rate?

      2/3

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  3. Talked of cynicism and sarcasm, and about how it is the thin veil that “protects a sentimentalist from caring too much”, and vulnerability expressed by humor respectively. This example demonstrated how some things are expressed in other ways and to show how we can be creative with that and show it. Looked at braille and the riddle which required us to decipher a sentence in braille. Then looked at counterintuitive predictions such as if we think something is likely or not, crazy or reasonable, etc… This showed us that our perceptions of things may change depending on the context or things that one may not have previously known. There is no work due next week, although I will definitely be touching up my rebuttal once more to make it as polished as I can make it.

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  4. Notes:

    Cynicism is the thin veil that protects a sentimentalist from caring too much.

    “I say what I believe as if it were true. My cards are face up on the table. If you ask me why I believe it, my reasonable response is that so far im winning the argument. Show your cards.”

    Answer to the riddle:
    Why is there braille at the drive-thru window?

    Professor Hodges would not be a counterintuitive comp teacher if it weren’t for the advertising failure article. Doctors don’t always catch what’s wrong with a person. One doctor had missed 10 cancers in the space of 18 months.

    Can we trust the public with the truth?
    Doctors should be held responsible for missed cancers.
    With the technology there shouldn’t be any missed diagnosis.
    The technology is better but not THAT much better.
    An accuracy rate of 80% in detecting cancers from mammograms is something to brag about.

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    1. I like these notes a lot, Velez. They record what you want to remember. The “Can we trust the public with the truth” question appears nowhere in the lesson plan, but indicates to me what you thought was important. I’m glad I helped you raise that question.
      4/3

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  5. – An argument is true until someone else contradicts that argument and provides stronger evidence to support his or her position.
    – “Sarcasm is vulnerability expressed as humor”
    · My position: Sarcasm is truth expressed as humor and irony. Sometimes, what you want to tell someone may sound horrible. I use sarcasm to romanticize my opinion about someone or something.
    – Make sure to express your argument as if it was true. For example, you might say, “Restrictive abortion laws are useless when it comes to protecting human life,” instead of saying, “Even though it might be wrong, I think that restrictive abortion laws do not work as expected.”

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    1. You and a few others have figured out, Chemia, that the Notes are a place to engage in an active collaboration with the classroom material. I never explicitly suggest that that’s the case, but I’m disappointed if nobody uses them to do so.

      I use sarcasm to romanticize my opinion about someone or something.

      That’s entirely reasonable, and intriguing, but not yet clear. And once you make it clear, I’m going to want you to rephrase the claim to better reflect how you would complete it:

      Sarcasm is _________________ expressed as humor.

      Or you could ignore this invitation.

      3/3

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  6. – If you state your argument and believe it then it’s true and is the best argument until someone comes along and try to dispute it
    – Discussed Braille and the process of how the dots were made for each letter of the alphabet
    Counterintuitive Predictions
    – True or false
    – Reasonable or unreasonable
    – Right or wrong

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  7. Anything can be made up, the statement only as strong until you show the better “cards” to beat that statement.
    Challenging what looks like an obvious truth- this is course is all about.

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  8. 11/1/18
    CARDS ON THE TABLE
    You automatically are winning an argument, just by stating something as a truth. Until someone challenges you..

    “sarcasm is anger expressed as humor”…
    That’s not all true, I use sarcasm to be silly
    Also, sarcasm is used towards people you usually don’t want to lash out on

    “sarcasm is fear expressed as humor”…
    No….that’s not it…

    “sarcasm is vulnerability expressed as humor”
    Ahhhhh, yes. I understand how it feels to be hurt from someone’s anger and I surely do not want to make someone I care about feel that way, so I use sarcasm to lighten the mood, but make my point clear.

    *Through conversation and give and take, you will create more accurate truths*

    THE BRAILLE RIDDLE
    Braille can be learned through memorizing the pattern of the first 10 letters of the braille alphabet, then lining the next 10 letters in the alphabet right under the first 10 and just add one more bump in the bottom left for each, then line the last five letters under those 10 and add one more bump on the bottom right. Simple memorization and addition!
    Riddle Deciphered:
    Why is there braille at the drive-thru window? …LOL. Good question.

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    1. You and a few others have figured out, Bean, that the Notes are a place to engage in an active collaboration with the classroom material. I never explicitly suggest that that’s the case, but I’m disappointed if nobody uses them to do so.

      I really appreciate that you memorialized the path of the conversation that resulted in “vulnerability” as the feeling sarcasm masks. It doesn’t exist except in your Notes and my memory, and your Notes are a lot more reliable. Thank you.

      4/3

      Liked by 1 person

  9. -you have to believe a persons say if he has his card up. and you can oppose the person when you have a better and stronger cards.
    -“Sarcasm is vulnerability expressed as humor”
    -Braille uses a domino type system where different dots raised mean different letters and hence by combining them a word is formed.
    – the braille answer was: ‘Why is there braille at the drive-thru window?’
    -why we install dog door sign..?? not for dogs for real but for the others not to use it.
    -An accuracy rate of detecting cancers from mammograms is something about 80%.
    -there are 3 kinds of Counterintuitive predictions:
    -True or false
    – Reasonable or unreasonable
    – Right or wrong

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  10. Cynicism is the thin veil that protects a sentimentalist from caring too much.

    Sarcasm is vulnerability expressed as humor.

    Not going to spoil the Braille riddle here but it was pretty humorous and made me chuckle.

    Dr. Adcock’s method of reporting error and mistakes were revolutionary as a means to reduce failures.

    He revolutionized the way data was accessed.

    He saw a way to make his doctors accountable for their errors. It is what Americans demand from their health care system.

    He made reports and charts much like a batting average in baseball for his cancer doctors in order to hold them accountable.

    Diagnosing cancer takes time for both the doctors and the patients. Women who go for a mammogram sometimes take all day and to hear a “you’re all good” at the end only to have the doctors, several months later, tell them that they made a mistake, further wasting time of the patients.

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    1. I love that you don’t merely record what you’ve heard in your Notes, Eagles, but instead process it and record your reactions to it. You’re much more likely to find such notes useful when you refer to them.

      4/3

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  11. An argument isn’t always 100% true, it’s an expression of what one point of view believes to be true. It’s true if it its the only “truth” someone else knows. Once they see that idea challenged, that’s when something becomes true or false.

    Analyzing a claim or argument isn’t always about whether the claim is true or false, rather the consequences are examined to say whether something is right or wrong.

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    1. Huh. Really intriguing. Notes like these are very refreshing, Joker. They give me faith that some students are actively engaging with the material to draw conclusions for themselves. (I wish more of them would speak up and express those conclusions, but I shouldn’t be greedy. I’m already privileged to read my students’ Notes. No other professor I’ve ever talked to gets to do that. 🙂 )
      4/3

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  12. Braille Riddle is a great way to get the brain moving. Say your point as of you mean it and you’ll already win the argument. Cynicism is the thin veil that protects a sentimentalist from caring too much.

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  13. 11-1-18

    “Cynicism is the thin veil that protects a sentimentalist from caring too much.”
    “Sarcasm is vulnerability expressed as humor”

    There are many methods created to making braille easier to read, much simpler than I thought!

    -You must accept that someone’s argument is true until you are able to refute it
    – When analysing a claim, question:
    Is this true or false? (or likely or unlikely)
    Is this reasonable or unreasonable?
    Is this right or wrong? (good/bad, ethical/unethical, moral/immoral)

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    1. You must accept that someone’s argument is true until you are able to refute it

      Scary idea, isn’t it? On the other hand, when you’re the speaker, the burden shifts to all who hear you. (Also the responsibility. Lying in the public sphere too often costs lives.)

      3/3

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  14. -our job to disprove the truth
    -I win the argument until you say something. My cards win until you show better cards
    -Learning Braille was easier than I thought it would be
    -You should answer a claim by thinking is it true or false, reasonable or unreasonable, or right or wrong

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  15. 11/1/18

    Cards are face up on the table. The argument is already known. One must just show their own cards pertaining to their side of the argument. Whoever has better cards will win.

    Moore’s Law – Technology gets more sophisticated and advanced each year. It is exponentially advancing. The first computer filled a large room and weighs 13 tons (maybe). Now computers can be as small as an iPhone.

    This does not help us read things better with our eyes. Technology has gotten better but it hasn’t translated into radically improved mammogram tech.

    There’s a whole lot more to analyze than we think at first glance. Some obvious things should be thought about more and analyzed deeper. There is always more to it than meets the eye.

    Like

    1. I couldn’t be more delighted that you regard the Notes space as a place to record your own thinking during the hour or so we share, KB. What I have to say is meant only to spark some thinking of your own.
      4/3

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