APA Citation and References

In-text APA Citation

In an article at the Center for Disease Control’s website called “Childhood Obesity Causes and Consequences,” the CDC issues the warning that a primary cause of excess weight gain in children is “eating high-calorie, low-nutrient foods and beverages” such as sugary drinks. Most people hearing the term “sugary drinks” think of soda exclusively; however, the category is much broader. According to the National Center for Health Statistics, “sugary drinks consist of fruit drinks, soda, energy drinks, sport drinks, and sicweetened waters.” In an attempt to alert us to the prevalence of sugar in commercial beverages, the Journal of Public Health Dentistry has compiled a list of what it considers sugary drinks, adding sweetened teas to the category. And finally, in the “Advice for Patients” section of the journal Nutrients, examples can be found of several sugary drink types including fruitades such as Gatorade and lemonade, fruit-flavored drinks like Kool-Aid and Fruit Punch, sodas such as Coke, Pepsi and 7Up, and energy drinks like Monster or Red Bull. These drinks are found in most American homes and often considered healthy. But Jennifer Pomeranz in the Journal of Public Health Policy warns that sugary drinks are the largest source of added sugars in most children’s diet and also their main source of calorie intake. When children drink soda, they take in more calories than they can immediately use, and the unspent calories get converted into fat.

References

Childhood Obesity Causes and Consequences. (2016, December 15). Retrieved April 16, 2018, from https://www.cdc.gov/obesity/childhood/causes.html

Keast, D., Fulgoni, V., Nicklas, T., & O’Neil, C. (2013). Food Sources of Energy and Nutrients among Children in the United States: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2003–2006. Nutrients5(1), 283–301. MDPI AG. Retrieved from http://dx.doi.org/10.3390/nu5010283

Mallonee, L. F., Boyd, L. D., & Stegeman, C. (2017). A scoping review of skills and tools oral health professionals need to engage children and parents in dietary changes to prevent childhood obesity and consumption of sugar-sweetened beverages. Journal of Public Health Dentistry, 77. doi:10.1111/jphd.12237

Ogden, Cynthia L., et al. Consumption of sugar drinks in the United States, 2005-2008. US Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics, 2011.

Pomeranz, J. L., Munsell, C. R., & Harris, J. L. (2013). Energy drinks: An emerging public health hazard for youth. Journal of Public Health Policy, 34(2), 254-271. doi:10.1057/jphp.2013.6

I see the model. Now, how does it work?

When the author of this argument about sugary drinks makes a reference to an academic journal, website, or magazine article in her essay, she quotes or paraphrases the article’s content and provides enough details in the text to help readers find the source in the References list.

Example 1 (Publisher and Title, plus Quote):
In an article at the Center for Disease Control’s website called “Childhood Obesity Causes and Consequences,” the CDC issues the warning that a primary cause of excess weight gain in children is “eating high-calorie, low-nutrient foods and beverages” such as sugary drinks.

Example 2 (Publisher plus quote):
According to the National Center for Health Statistics, “sugary drinks consist of fruit drinks, soda, energy drinks, sport drinks, and sweetened waters.”

Example 3 (Name of Journal, plus Paraphrase):
In an attempt to alert us to the prevalence of sugar in commercial beverages, the Journal of Public Health Dentistry has compiled a list of what it considers sugary drinks, adding sweetened teas to the category.

Example 4 (Name of Journal, Title of Article, plus Paraphrase):
And finally, in the “Advice for Patients” section of the journal Nutrients, examples can be found of several sugary drink types including fruitades such as Gatorade and lemonade, fruit-flavored drinks like Kool-Aid and Fruit Punch, sodas such as Coke, Pepsi and 7Up, and energy drinks like Monster or Red Bull.

Example 5 (Author, Name of Journal, plus Paraphrase):
But Jennifer Pomeranz in the Journal of Public Health Policy warns that sugary drinks are the largest source of added sugars in most children’s diet and also their main source of calorie intake. When children drink soda, they take in more calories than they can immediately use, and the unspent calories get converted into fat.

Exercise

FOR REVIEW: In a Reply below, import a paragraph from one of your arguments that contains a citation, along with its accompanying Reference note.

Comment that you believe your citation and Reference comply with academic standards or that you’re having trouble and need help creating good citations.

 

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