Annotated Bibliography – Ivonid12

  1. “2010 New England Patriots Statistics & Players.” Pro-Football-Reference.comhttp://www.pro-football-reference.com/teams/nwe/2010.htm.

Background: This website shows the full offensive and defensive stats for the 2010 New England Patriots. This article show full team stats and rankings that season, as well as individual player stats and their rewards. It also show any stats accumulated in the post season.

How I used it: I used theses stats to further explain my argument for why quarterbacks receive tremendous help from the defense. This helped show the full metrics on how defenses provide a ton of opportunities for offenses.

2. “2011 Green Bay Packers Statistics & Players.” Pro-Football-Reference.comhttp://www.pro-football-reference.com/teams/gnb/2011.htm.

Background: This website shows the full offensive and defensive stats for the 2011 Green Bay Packers. This article show full team stats and rankings that season, as well as individual player stats and their rewards. It also show any stats accumulated in the post season.

How I used it: I used this website to provide an argument on how most MVP quarterbacks have a defense that creates turnovers providing more opportunity.

3.

https://www.pro-football-reference.com/awards/ap-nfl-mvp-award.htm

Background: This link shows a full list of every single AP NFL MVP in the history of the sport.

How I used it: I referenced this article many times to show how quarterback dominant the MVP award really is. Also to show that sometimes running-backs win and the fact that there was only one defensive MVP in the history of the NFL.

4. “J.J. Watt Stats.” Pro-Football-Reference.comhttp://www.pro-football-reference.com/players/W/WattJ.00.htm.

Background: This shows the full stats of NFL player J.J Watt during his whole career.

How I used it: J.J Watt’s 2014 season is easily the most recent and best case for a defensive player deserving the MVP award. His season in 2014 was more than deserving of the MVP award in 2014 but lost to Aaron Rodgers in 2014. He did receive votes though at least.

5. “NFL Team Points per Game.” NFL Football Stats – NFL Team Points per Game on TeamRankings.com, http://www.teamrankings.com/nfl/stat/points-per-game?date=2018-02-05

Background: This source shows the rankings of offensive Points Per Game for every NFL in NFL History.

How I used it: I used this source to show how in this current NFL season how points are easier than ever to come by. When you compare the current NFL season to last season, you have multiple teams averaging over 30+ points per game. I used this for my argument for defensive players, as since offense is as easy as ever great defense is as valuable as ever.

6. Maske, Mark. “For the NFL, There Is No Such Thing as Too Much Scoring.” The Washington Post, WP Company, 17 Oct. 2018, http://www.washingtonpost.com/sports/2018/10/17/nfl-there-is-no-such-thing-too-much-scoring/?noredirect=on&utm_term=.b3be62c525fc.

Background: This article explains the recent boom in offensive productivity in 2018, and a possible explanation on why it is happening. The article also discusses current rule changes for why it could be happening.

How I used it: I used this article for further explanation on why offenses around the NFL have it easier than its ever been. I used this for my argument on how defensive stars are more valuable than ever considering how easy offense is.

7. “2000 Baltimore Ravens Statistics & Players.” Pro-Football-Reference.com, http://www.pro-football-reference.com/teams/rav/2000.htm.

Background: This website shows the full offensive and defensive stats for the 2000 Baltimore Ravens. This article show full team stats and rankings that season, as well as individual player stats and their rewards. It also show any stats accumulated in the post season.

How I used it: The 2000 Baltimore Ravens had the worst quarterback situation for a team to win the Super Bowl. The Ravens started two different quarterbacks for each half of the season and both quarterbacks were bad. The defense was dominant in an era with great offenses, and I used my this for my argument to show how great defenses can propel  teams to  championships with bad quarterbacks.

8. 28, January. “Steve Young: Quarterback Is the Most Important Position in Football.” Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles Times, 28 Jan. 2012, articles.latimes.com/2012/jan/28/sports/la-sp-steve-young-20120129.

Background: This source is an opinionated piece by former quarterback Steve Young explaining why he believes the quarterback is the most important position in football.

How I used it: I used this source in my rebuttal to explain why Steve Young is hypocritical in his argument as well as why some of his points can be applied to defensive players as well.

9. “Mitchell Trubisky Stats.” Pro-Football-Reference.com, http://www.pro-football-reference.com/players/T/TrubMi00.htm.

Background: This  source shows the stats that quarterback Mitchell Trubisky has accumulated over his short career.

How I used it: I used this source in my rebuttal to show how Trubisky’s career has taken  a turn for the better after having new head coach Matt Nagy buildt an offense for him. It helps my rebuttal explain how much coaching has an impact on a quarterback’s play.

10. “Jared Goff Stats.” Pro-Football-Reference.com, http://www.pro-football-reference.com/players/G/GoffJa00.htm.

Background: This source shows the stats that quarterback Jared Goff has accumulated over his short career.

How I used it: I used this source in my rebuttal to show how Goff’s career has taken  a turn for the better after having new head coach Sean McVay buildt an offense for him. It helps my rebuttal explain how much coaching has an impact on a quarterback’s play, as now Goff is one of the better quarterbacks in the league.

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