Bibliography — Wisemann101

The recognition of the right to physician-assisted suicide is a protection of individual civil liberties

Wellman, Carl. “A Legal Right to Physician-Assisted Suicide Defended.” Social Theory and Practice, vol. 29, no. 1, 2003, pp. 19–38. JSTOR, JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/23559212.

Background: According to Carl, people should be given liberal rights to physician assisted suicide. He states that the rights should be recognized and everyone should be granted the right to choose what should be done to his or her health.

How I sued it: This book enabled me to really understand why there is need for everyone to possess a right to control what to happen to his or her life.

Myers, Richard S. “The Constitutionality of Laws Banning Physician Assisted Suicide.” BYU Journal of Public Law, vol. 31, no. 2, June 2017, pp. 395 408.EBSCOhost, libezp.lib.lsu.edu/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=a9h&AN=123908136&site=ehost-live&scope=site.

Background: Richard Meyers discusses some withdrawals form treatment resulted to some establishments to terminate lives of terminally ill patients. Therefore, this did not approve euthanasia. He says there is a thin line between the right to physician assisted suicide and withdrawal form treatment. Myers explains some of the cases of withdrawal from treatments and how it has resulted to some laws banning assisted suicide.

How I used it: This book helped me to understand the present difference between the rights to physician assisted suicide and withdrawal of a patient form treatment. In addition, I have to learn that there are constitutional laws that applies in case laws need to be adhered to regarding assisted suicide.

Loveland, Kristen. “Death and Its Dignities.” New York University Law Review 91.5 (2016): 1279-1315.

Background: Kristen discusses the purpose of dignity and what it means to have a dignified death. She compares the topic with physician-assisted suicide and the aspect of death penalty. The aspect of rights to assisted suicide is compared to death with dignity and if the individual is allowed to die according to her or his wishes, it is made a dignified death. For instance, some patients might be affected form terminally ill diseases like terminally ill cancers; it is respectable to allow these people die in peace.

How I used it: The article made me to understand that there is a dignified death. In this connection. There is need to allow patients who request assisted suicide to be guaranteed the right to do so.

O’Rourke, Mark A., et al. “Reasons to Reject Physician Assisted Suicide/Physician Aid in Dying.” Journal of Oncology Practice, vol. 13, no. 10, Oct. 2017, pp. 683-686. EBSCOhost, doi:10.1200/JOP.2017.021840.

Background: Mark O’Rourke, M. Colleen O’Rourke, and Matthew Hudson worked together to generate some valid ideas and they argued against physician-assisted suicide (PAS). They argue that PAS has an adverse effect for the oncology experts. O’Rourke states that over the past decades, palliative care and hospice care have spread greatly.

How I used it: o used this material to identify various ways in which palliative care can be employed to assist patients to recover from the terminal illness and to reduce any present pain. Very few people can endure terminal pain; therefore, it is possible for hospice care to assist these patients to regain energy.

Gagnon, James D., and Thomas A. Preston. “Autonomy in Physician-Assisted Suicide.” The Hastings Center Report, vol. 30, no. 3, 2000, pp. 4–5. JSTOR, JSTOR, www.jstor.org/stable/3528036.

Background: Preston and Gagnon argues that there is no autonomy in patients; all that exists is the choice of a patient to have assisted suicide. They argue that instead of asserting a person’s autonomy PAD is an impediment to it, it is a false perception of creating clinical field of doctors. They claim that autonomy can never be absolute.

How I used it: I used this book to learn that indeed autonomy cannot be absolute for patients who seek physician-assisted suicide. We should learn to see physician Assisted Suicide in relation to normal death.

Quill, Timothy E., and Jane Greenlaw. “Physician-assisted death.” (2008).

Background: Quill, Timothy E., and Jane Greenlaw argues that physician assisted suicide is a significant topic, which has been discussed for a long time. Many governments have tried to implement laws that regulate assisted suicide but little efforts have been made. Grant other are arguing that the rights should net while other are advocating for them.

How I used it: I used this book to identify why there are contrary opinions on who should determine when an individual is to die. I also used it to learn various opinions on why some states have legislated assisted suicide laws and others have not.

Ardelt, Monika. “Physician-assisted death.” Handbook of death and dying 1 (2003): 424-434.

Background: According to Monika, there is need for considerable cases to offer physician assisted rights to patients. This case is only applicable and recommended to patients who are terminally ill and does not have any signs of recovering since they are enduring extreme pain, which is unbearable.

How I used it: I used this book to evaluate what is the best solution for patients who are experiencing unbearable pains from terminally ill patients.

Miller, Franklin G., et al. “Regulating physician-assisted death.” (1994): 119-123.

Background: According to Miller, there are medical technology advancements, which can be used to regulate cases of assisted suicide. Therefore, this should not be the only option to deal with patients with terminal illness.

How I used it: Through this article, I am able to identify means used to relieve pains in patients experiencing terminal illness. I have also discovered various ways to regulate PAS.

Veath, R. M. “Physician-Assisted Death.” JAMA-Journal of the American Medical     Association-US Edition 272.12 (1994): 979.

Background: According to Veath, it is important for hospitals to develop means of enabling palliative care to patients with terminal illness. With the incorporation of medical ethics, clinical medicine and medicolegal, experts are working to reduce instances of physician assisted suicide.

How I used it: I used this article to learn various approaches used for palliative care and maintenance of medical ethics.

Koch, Tom, et al. “Physician-Assisted Death.” The Hastings Center Report 33.1 (2003): 5-7.

Background: According to Koch, the right to physician-assisted suicide is recommended under two conditions. One when the idea is voluntary form the patient and secondly when the medical condition of the patient is not controllable. Therefore, if the patient is under pain, he or she can requested prescriptions that can assist in terminating the life easily.

How I used it: I used this article to learn when the right to physician-assisted suicide should be used

2 thoughts on “Bibliography — Wisemann101”

  1. Wisemann, I’m trying to use your Bibliography to find my way to your sources, and I need your help. I’ve spent half an hour searching for your Gagnon, Preston BOOK without luck. The link you provided to JSTOR keeps directing me to the Letters section of a Journal called The Hastings Center Report, where the authors are represented only as writers of letters to the editor. Is this your source? You called it a book in your description.

    I’ve read the letters carefully and can find no support for the conclusions you draw here. You say:

    Background: Preston and Gagnon argues that there is no autonomy in patients; all that exists is the choice of a patient to have assisted suicide. They argue that instead of asserting a person’s autonomy PAD is an impediment to it, it is a false perception of creating clinical field of doctors. They claim that autonomy can never be absolute.

    How I used it: I used this book to learn that indeed autonomy cannot be absolute for patients who seek physician-assisted suicide. We should learn to see physician Assisted Suicide in relation to normal death.

    What I found:

    Gagnon argues that patients have as much autonomy as anybody else to decide whether or not to commit suicide but that doctors should have nothing to do with the procedure.

    Preston argues almost the exact opposite, claiming that having the option of doctor-assisted suicide increases patient autonomy by offering an alternative to having to conduct suicide alone.

    Your bibliographic citation gives the appearance of citing an article co-authored by Gagnon and Preston in which they share views. That’s not the case at all.

    Let’s work on this. Reply below, please.

    Like

  2. For Quill and Greenlaw, I did not find a book titled “Physician-Assisted Death” 2008.

    I did find my way to this book published by the Hastings Center, though:

    http://thehastingscenter.org/uploadedFiles/Publications/Briefing_Book/physician-assisted%20death%20chapter.pdf

    To that book, Quill and Greenlaw contributed Chapter 30, which credits them this way:
    Timothy E. Quill and Jane Greenlaw, “Physician-Assisted Death,” in From
    Birth to Death and Bench to Clinic: The Hastings Center Bioethics Briefing
    Book for Journalists, Policymakers, and Campaigns, ed. Mary Crowley
    (Garrison, NY: The Hastings Center, 2008), 137-142.

    That’s WAY too much work for your reader to go through to find his way to your sources, Wisemann. The Hastings Center link above would have been easy to provide and would have saved me another half hour.

    Like

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