Causal Argument- beachgirl04

Dehydration.
There’s a lot more to it.

Many individuals wisely drink water to avoid dehydration. But they do so without knowing what happens to a dehydrated body or whether water is the best preventative. Dehydrated bodies don’t necessarily lose consciousness from a lack of water, but the health consequences are serious nonetheless. Inside the bodies of athletes doing strenuous exercise—or even couch potatoes clicking the remote—fluid lack can permit dangerous body temperature changes or disregulate blood flow to vital organs and the brain. There’s no excuse to risk ill-health when drinking, on average, eight 8-ounce glasses of liquid every day can prevent it.

Body fluid balance is controlled by both physiological and behavioral actions. However, when there is lack of fluid availability, exposure to extreme environments, or illness, inability to maintain fluid balance can seriously jeopardize health and the ability to perform. The terms euhydration, hypohydration, and hyperhydration will be used. Euhydration defines a normal, narrow fluctuation in body water content, whereas the terms hypohydration and hyperhydration define, respectively, a general deficit (hypohydration) and surfeit (hyperhydration) in body water content beyond normal (Kenefick, 71). This is why it has always been important for athletes to “stay hydrated” and “to drink a lot of water before they perform” because their ability will be affected by the amount of liquid inside of their body. However, when someone gets dehydrated one time they feel as if they have to drink an excessive amount of water; hyper-hydration which could be just as bad for them and could mess up the balance of their inside cells.  Dehydration has a large impact on the internal body systems, this article was written referring to the army soldiers since they are individuals who are out in the heat of a desert for countless hours each and everyday and they do not have a choice.

Hydration takes time, you can’t become hydrated from taking a sip of a cup of water every other hour. That is for sure not healthy and not going to help you stay away from the negative effects that dehydration has on you. It is obvious that dehydration is more likely to happen to athletes because of how much they perform. But in a study there was high school student athletes who lost weight by restricting fluids because they were required to do so. Cardiac output, heart rate, stoke volume, and oxygen difference were measured in 16 high school wrestlers during exercise at normal weight, after a four or five percent weight loss, and following one hour of rehydration. Weight losses were accomplished over 48 hours by fluid and food restriction as well as intermittent exercise. It was concluded that despite a short rehydration period, the cardiovascular dynamics of these high school wrestlers rapidly returned to normal during moderately heavy work because of the small plasma changes that accompanied the 48-hour weight loss (Allen, 159-163). Drinking water has such an impact on individuals bodies, in these wrestlers who had lost weight it was because they were not drinking water at the time but after a quick rehydration period their body returned to normal. For athletes and anyone else who exercises regularly, Exercising while dehydrated has some effects on the thermoregulatory system and may negate the physiologic advantages resulting from increased fitness and heat acclimization. The human body is composed of about 65% water, separated into extracellular and intracellular fluid. With exercise comes changes in hydrostatic and osmotic pressure (Casa ,249). There are even performance implications that come with dehydration among athletes such as 3% to 4% dehydration elicits a performance decrement and that environmental conditions can also play a role in performance not just dehydration. It is more likely that a wrestler experiences problems with performance because of hypo-hydration then immediate hyper-hydration (Casa, 250).

The amount of changes that occur in the human body as result of having water in it or not having water in it are beyond belief. It does not only effect a body physically and cause someone to pass out when they are not consuming enough water but it effects the cells of one’s insides. This article provides a comprehensive review of dehydration assessment and presents a unique evaluation of the dehydration and performance literature. The importance of osmolality and volume are emphasized as the single most essential aspect of dehydration assessment. No clear threshold or plausible mechanisms support the impairment in strength observed with dehydration. Similarly, the potential for dehydration to impair cognition appears small. The impact of dehydration on any particular sport skill or task is therefore likely dependent upon the makeup of the task itself (Cheuvront). The insides of our body are not balanced when there is not enough water inside, for example there is a linear regression of plasma volume change and body mass change after athletes sweat out water (closer to dehydration) but when we are drinking water whether it is a normal amount of an excessive amount our volume changes and rises. Each physiologic system in the human body is influenced by whether or not the dehydration is severe or not (Casa, 249).

References:

Dehydration and Rehydration. Book Chapter- Wilderness Medicine Textbook. 2012. Retrieved from http://www.dtic.mil/dtic/tr/fulltext/u2/a559016.pdf

Dehydration: Physiology, Assessment, and Performance Effects.Wiley Online Library.  (10 Jan 2014). Retrieved from https://doi.org/10.1002/cphy.c130017.

Exercise in the Heat. I. Fundamentals of Thermal Physiology, Performance Implication, and Dehydration. Journal of Athletic Training. (1999.) Retrieved from https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1322918/pdf/jathtrain00007-0030.pdf.

Hemodynamic response to submaximal exercise after dehydration and rehydration in high school wrestlers. 1 Jan 1977. Retrieved from https://europepmc.org/abstract/med/593078.

 

3 thoughts on “Causal Argument- beachgirl04”

  1. BeachGirl, can you guide me in any way to make a more targeted response to your post than “feedback, please”?

    I’m trying to help as many students as possible, and I can be more help to everyone if you ask me specific questions or guide my reading to aspects of your writing that concern you most. I’ll respond first to students who ask me questions I can answer in 15-30 minutes.

    Once I respond and you make substantial changes, you can put the post back into Feedback Please for another set of specific questions.

    I’d appreciate the give-and-take. Thanks.

    Like

  2. BeachGirl, you didn’t ask any specific questions, so I’m going to have a free-for-all. I hope you were seeking advice about your first paragraph because, when I’m given no direction, I often get distracted by the shiny objects in front of me, and that means I don’t get to Paragraph 2.

    (Before I go negative, please let me express my admiration, BeachGirl04, for the number of times you’ve sought and received feedback and responded maturely and with gratitude. Honestly, your level of commitment to the “social and recursive” nature of writing is an inspiration. And you always get better! And I always enjoy the exchange, so thank you. It’s been an honor to be your harshest critic.)

    Let’s shred your Introduction.

    For many individuals they drink water so they do not become dehydrated, which makes a lot of sense because in order to stay hydrated you must drink enough water. But have you ever wondered is that really the way to avoid dehydration? Do you really even know what dehydration means and what happens to your body when you are dehydrated? Dehydration is a serious health issue that so many people deal with and it comes from our body not having enough water in it. Dehydration does not just mean someone will pass out and lose consciousness if they do not have enough water in their body, there is so much more to it. The insides of bodies change, the brain changes, so many different parts of our body are affected when we are dehydrated. Dehydration can occur at any point in time, it is likely to occur during exercise or strenuous activity but that doesn’t mean it can’t happen on an everyday basis to just any human being. It is unbelievable the amount of people who allow themselves to get dehydrated when it is a simple task in order to not become dehydrated. In order to stay hydrated it is said to drink eight, eight ounce glasses daily for some it may take more while others it may take less.

    1. It’s too long.
    2. I contains Rhetorical Questions for which you do not hold a license.
    3. It violates the ban on 2nd-person language.
    4. It contains illegal (the only kind!) comma splices.
    5. It says “the amount of people,” when it should say (because people can be counted) “the number of people.”
    6. It says “in order to” three times when ideally it would never say “in order to.”

    For many individuals they drink water so they do not become dehydrated,

    This is illegal sentence construction, BG. The noun (individuals) followed by its pronoun (they) is just as illegal as if you had said, “My brother he drinks” when what you meant was “My brother drinks.” So, instead:

    Many individuals drink water so they do not become dehydrated,

    Now, POSITIVE verbs are always more powerful and robust than negative verbs, so:

    Many individuals drink water to avoid dehydration.

    Continuing:

    which makes a lot of sense because in order to stay hydrated you must drink enough water.

    You should know to avoid the Banned 2nd person, and while we’re banning things, let’s ban “in order to” in 99% of cases. So:

    wisely.

    Let me show you how that works:

    Many individuals wisely drink water to avoid dehydration.

    See how the one word communicates that “it makes a lot of sense to drink a lot of water to avoid dehydration?” Moving on:

    But have you ever wondered is that really the way to avoid dehydration? Do you really even know what dehydration means and what happens to your body when you are dehydrated?

    Now we’re going to eliminate the Rhetorical Questions, which have only one effect (a negative one): to empower your readers to think of their own answers. Give them answers, BeachGirl. Don’t ask.

    But they do so without knowing what happens to a dehydrated body or whether water is the best preventative.

    Here we want a paragraph break. You’ve done your job planting the notion that what we all take for granted might be questionable. “She’s right! I’ve never given this topic any thought! I hope she has answers!”

    Dehydration is a serious health issue that so many people deal with and it comes from our body not having enough water in it. Dehydration does not just mean someone will pass out and lose consciousness if they do not have enough water in their body, there is so much more to it.

    This is the beginning of a new paragraph. Your lead-in was “what happens to the body?” I’m just going to tighten up the language.

    Dehydrated bodies don’t necessarily lose consciousness from a lack of water, but the health consequences are serious nonetheless.

    So, no unconsciousness. What, then?

    The insides of bodies change, the brain changes, so many different parts of our body are affected when we are dehydrated. Dehydration can occur at any point in time, it is likely to occur during exercise or strenuous activity but that doesn’t mean it can’t happen on an everyday basis to just any human being.

    You don’t actually say what happens, so I’m going to improvise.

    Inside the bodies of athletes doing strenuous exercise—or even couch potatoes clicking the remote—fluid lack can permit dangerous body temperature changes or disregulate blood flow to vital organs and the brain.

    Now bring home how easily catastrophe can be avoided.

    There’s no excuse to risk ill-health when drinking, on average, eight 8-ounce glasses of liquid every day can prevent it.

    Revised:

    Many individuals wisely drink water to avoid dehydration. But they do so without knowing what happens to a dehydrated body or whether water is the best preventative. Dehydrated bodies don’t necessarily lose consciousness from a lack of water, but the health consequences are serious nonetheless. Inside the bodies of athletes doing strenuous exercise—or even couch potatoes clicking the remote—fluid lack can permit dangerous body temperature changes or disregulate blood flow to vital organs and the brain. There’s no excuse to risk ill-health when drinking, on average, eight 8-ounce glasses of liquid every day can prevent it.

    Once I saw the brevity of the resulting paragraph, I decided it could be one paragraph after all.

    Maybe this isn’t the sort of critique you wanted, BeachGirl04. I hope you find it helpful. Feel free to put this post back into the Feedback Please category along with your specific request for Feedback-on-demand.

    Like

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